Day 1, Oct 03, 2020
11:00AM - 12:30PM
Welcome Remarks and Opening Session
PanelistsGloria Wong-PadoongpattDr. Gloria Wong-Padoongpatt is an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her research programs include different aspects of Asian American mental health, specifically the stressful impact of microaggressions and addictions. Gloria also is the current Secretary/Historian for AAPA and considers AAPA her professional home where she has developed life-long relationships. She has been an active member for over ten years and started her AAPA journey as a student volunteer. AAPA is deeply intertwined with Gloria's professional identity and this organization has afforded her numerous opportunities to pursue various social justice initiatives. Although the world is a bit gloomy at this moment, she is excited for the future of this organization.Stanley SueDr. Stanley Sue is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Palo Alto University and at the University of California, Davis. From 1981-1996, he was a Professor of Psychology at UCLA. From 1971-1981, he was Assistant and Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Washington. He also served as Director of the National Research Center on Asian American Mental Health, an NIMH-funded research center from 1988-2001, and was 1996-2001 Director of Asian American Studies Program at UC Davis.His research has been devoted to the study of the adjustment of, and delivery of mental health services to, culturally-diverse groups, especially Asian Americans. In terms of past scholarly impact and contributions, Dr. Sue was ranked first in multicultural counseling (Ponterotto, Fingerhut, & McGuinness, 2012). He has served as President of APA Divisions 9 and 45 and of the Western Psychological Association.Alvin AlvarezAlvin Alvarez is currently the Dean of the College of Health and Social Sciences at San Francisco State University. His doctorate is in counseling psychology from the University of Maryland. His scholarship focuses on Asian Americans, racial identity, and the psychological impact of racism and has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health and has been awarded the Janet E. Helms Award for Mentoring and Scholarship and the Asian Pacific American Network Research Award from the American College Personnel Association. He received the Lifetime Achievement in Mentoring Award from the Society of Counseling Psychology. He is a past President of the Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity and Race – Division 45 of APA and the Asian American Psychological Association who awarded him their Distinguished Contributions Award and the Early Career Award. His proudest achievements though are his two daughters – Sabrina (11) and Sophie (8) – who are convinced they are smart and funny girls with even more important things to accomplish than him!Nellie TranNellie Tran, Ph.D. is the daughter of Vietnamese refugee boat people, mother to two little humans, and spouse to another. She is an Associate Professor with the San Diego State University Dept of Counseling & School Psychology. She is an activist-scholar and a community psychologist by training. Her scholarship and activism work is both personal and professional across multiple topics such as improving hostile academic spaces for students and faculty to local coalition building to more effectively connect resources in the asylum seekers crisis at the San Diego-Mexico border. My central mission is to infiltrate systems of oppression to disrupt from within. Within AAPA, she has served as a leadership fellow, co-chair of the leadership fellows program, a board director, finance officer, and currently your vice president. Outside of AAPA, she has served on a charter school board, Division 27 EC board, and as a clinic research director.ModeratorJennifer HsiaJennifer Hsia, Ph.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in Keck School of Medicine at USC. Her appointment is Behavioral Health Consultant Psychologist at USC Student Health. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of South Dakota in 2015 where she completed her predoctoral clinical internship at American Lake VA in Tacoma, Washington and a clinical postdoctoral fellowship at the San Diego VA/UC San Diego. She received an APA MFP Predoctoral MHSAS fellow and was a PSI Fellow in 2018. Clinically, Dr. Hsia has interests and experiences in integrated healthcare, health psychology, and behavioral medicine. Professionally, she is Co-chair of 2020 AAPA Convention. She is passionate about serving individuals from underserved and underprivileged communities and speaks Mandarin.Maximilian TokarskyMax Tokarsky, Psy.D., is a Clinical Psychologist from Dayton, Ohio who works in integrated primary care settings for Community Health Clinics of Greater Dayton and as an Independent Contractor. He received his Doctorate of Clinical Psychology in 2018 from the Wright State School of Professional Psychology. He fondly remembers completing his internship and postdoctoral training at The Guidance Center in Long Beach, California. He is the Communications Chair of The Division on Asian Americans of Multiple Heritages and the incoming Co-chair of the AAPA Convention. Max is passionate about serving children, communities of color, and immigrants. He was a 2016 Predoctoral Fellow of the APA's Minority Fellowship Program. He enjoys bicycling, dodgeball, yoga, chanting, and meditation for self-care.*This program qualifies for 1 Continuing Education Unit (CEU). CEU's are sponsored by Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.To receive your CEU, attendees must complete the following evaluation form: https://uisits.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2f5yym1Pb4L3gS9
12:45PM - 01:45PM
Division on Practice Presents: "Burning yourself out?"
Speakers
Thuy Truong
Presenters: Thuy Truong, Keziah Lyu, WonYoung Cho, Susan Han, Sunny Ho, Judy Huang, Meiyang Kadaba, Calvin Lee, Joanna Maung, Kevin Skiles, and Shiyu Zhang.Burnout occurs cross culturally and is reported to be prevalent among mental health workers (Morse, Salyers, Rollins, Monroe-DeVita, & Pfahler, 2012). When COVID-19 hit, stress escalated as concerns around health, finance, and safety were coupled with adjusting to a "new normal" amid a pandemic that threatened the livelihood of individuals across the globe. Moreover, racism intensified as reports indicated an increase in Asians and Asian American populations experiencing COVID-19 related discrimination, assaults, and ridicules. In this session, we will examine AAPI clinicians' experiences during the pandemic, factors that contribute to the burnout of AAPI mental health providers and its impact on clinical work, and ways to engage in effective self-care.*This program qualifies for 1 Continuing Education Unit (CEU). CEU's are sponsored by Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.To receive your CEU, attendees must complete the following evaluation form:https://uisits.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_43hhOShwL0kNDEN
12:45PM - 01:45PM
Asian American Journal of Psychology: Meet the Editor
Format : Oral Abstracts
Speakers
Chu Kim-Prieto
Presenter: Chu Kim-PrietoPlease come meet the editor of AAJP, the official journal of the Asian American Psychology Association, published by APA. Learn more about the journal itself and its latest happenings, the editorial process, and how to become involved as a peer reviewer. Students, early career professionals, as well as established practitioners and researchers are all welcome!
12:45PM - 01:45PM
Townhall
02:00PM - 03:00PM
Virtual Social Hour
Please join us as we announce the 2020 AAPA awardees for the Steve Fund, Dissertation Awards, ECP Research, ECP Service, Distinguished Contributions to Research, and Distinguished Contributions to Leadership. After announcing and celebrating our awardees, please feel free to stay around and get to know your fellow attendees through a quick 15-minute game of Lightening Scavenger Hunt. No need to sign-up beforehand. Time will be left over at the end of the hour to take a break from Zoom, stretch, eat, and practice self-care.
03:15PM - 04:15PM
Division on South Asian Americans Presents: "Second-Generation South Asian American identities: Multiple Perspectives"
Presenters: Devika Srivastava and Asha Unni The course will serve as a brief introduction to the psychological experiences of second-generation South Asian Americans. Course materials will present information related to South Asian American identity development and how that may vary given differing varied geographical diaspora and acculturative experiences. Differences may be related to level of acculturation, ethnic identity, as well as the impacts of intersectional social identities. Topics will also briefly cover the model minority myth, the role of family and community, and mental health stigma as applied to South Asian Americans. The course will also explore possible clinical interventions and approaches that may be relevant when working with second-generation South Asian American clients.*This program qualifies for 1 Continuing Education Unit (CEU). CEU's are sponsored by Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.To receive your CEU, attendees must complete the following evaluation form: https://uisits.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8puAqJbhtW2M3bv
03:15PM - 04:15PM
Q&A for Pre-Recorded Sessions
Promoting Liberation through Collective Leadership
04:30PM - 05:30PM
Division On Women Presents: "A space to nurture AAPI women’s experiences and relationships in the 2020 year"
Presenter: TBD
04:30PM - 05:30PM
Division on Filipinx Americans Presents: "Balancing personal and professional life in the double pandemic: three different perspectives"
Presenters: Michelle Madore, Christine Catipon, and Claire Reclosado-BaclayWhile we like to think work/life balance is something which may be achieved without sacrifice, in reality it is not. It is an ongoing process where we are re-evaluating our needs and values in hopes of making decisions which are consistent with our priorities in a given point in time. Depending on where we are in our personal lives and our professional development, our priorities change. As a result, our response to a particular situation will vary based on our priorities at that time. With the addition of new life stressors, professions across all areas of psychology are placed in situations where challenging decisions and difficult dialogues arise at a rate much more frequent than in the recent past. This talk will help participants to approach these situations in a way that is consistent with their values resulting. This approach to self-care and decision making process helps individuals to build resilience.*This program qualifies for 1 Continuing Education Unit (CEU). CEU's are sponsored by Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.To receive your CEU, attendees must complete the following evaluation form: https://uisits.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3pFR2qOLb0IJnNz
04:30PM - 05:30PM
Townhall
Day 2, Oct 04, 2020
11:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Division on Asian Americans with Multiple Heritages Presents: "Counseling Asian American adoptees: Context and complexity"
Format : Oral Abstracts
Presenters: Kimberly Langrehr, Amanda Baden, and Amy Kobus This workshop will address the social-cultural implications of transnational adoption for Asian adoptees. In addition to briefly reviewing concepts and research most relevant to Asian transnational adoptees, presenters will discuss important contextual factors for mental health practitioners to consider in their work with supporting this community.*This program qualifies for 1 Continuing Education Unit (CEU). CEU's are sponsored by Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.To receive your CEU, attendees must complete the following evaluation form: https://uisits.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bdvBYE8oiKugJtr
11:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Q&A for Pre-Recorded Sessions
11:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Townhall
12:15PM - 01:15PM
Poster Session I (Group 1 & 3)
Format : Poster Abstracts
Group 1- Practice/ Mental HealthPredictors of Depression Among Asian American UndergraduatesSaniya Soni Emotion regulation mediates the relationship between acculturation/enculturation and depressive symptoms among Asian and Latinx AmericansLucia Quezada, Sumaiya Nusrath & William TsaiTiwala: Building Trust to Recruit Filipino American Families: CARE-T2D StudyHillary Peregrina, Grace Yoo, Melinda BenderWatering the Roots of Cultural Wealth: Redefining Healing through Trauma for Asian American College SurvivorsGrace Poon GhaffariThe role of horizontal and vertical individualism and collectivism for Taiwanese American undergraduates' well-being: Emphasizing values within a psychosociocultural approachTracy C. Guan, Terence Chen, Alberta M. Gloria & Jeanett CastellanosThe Relationship between Hookup Behaviors and Family Structure among Asian American Young Adults in the United StatesYushan Zhao, Jessica Michele Dennis Asian American Women's Gendered Racial Socialization: A CQR ApproachMichelle Gomes, Lydia HaRim Ahn, Brian Keum, Gintare Meizys, Adil ChoudhryShame, Shame Coping Behavior, and Help Seeking Behavior Among Three Asian American Ethnic GroupsKeziah Lyu & Sydnie Yoo The Preliminary Efficacy of Expressive Helping for Chinese American Cancer Patients and SurvivorsCharlotte Teng, M.A., Sophia Hon, MSW, Angela Wang, M.A.; Ruidi Zhu, M.A., Liwei Zhang, Ph.D., Tiffany Wong, B.S. & William Tsai, Ph.D.  Unveiling the Heterogeneity of South Asian Immigrant Subgroups: A call for more rigorous research on American clinical conceptualizations.Sandra A. Kennedy, M.A., Ahnaf Annur, Alice Gavarrete Olvera, M.A., Mahathi Kosuri, M.A., Desiree Byrd, Ph.D. Internalizing shame as a barrier for receiving mental health services in Asian AmericansJulie Huynh, M.A. & Meng-Ju Yang, Psy.D.Group 3 - Covid-19 & Current IssuesSeva: Sangats Response to the PandemicPreet Kaur SabharwalExamining Emotional and Instrumental Support as Moderators on the Relationship Between COVID-related anti-Asian Racism and Mental Health SymptomsAmelia Yang, Chuck Liu & Tao LiuUsing Social Support to Cope with COVID-19-Related Online Direct and Vicarious Racial Discrimination: The Moderating Role of Locus of ControlYun Lu & Cixin WangAsian Americans Experience Greater Microassaults During the 2020 COVID-19 PandemicAaron Cheng, Alexandra Mendez B.A, Zerick Patriana, Brooklyn King, Aldo Barrita, Gloria Wong-Padoongpatt Ph.D.  A Double-Edged Sword: Family Values Act as Protective and Risk Factors for Asian-American College Students' Mental Health during the COVID-19 PandemicZhou, E., Kyeong, Y., Cheung, C.S., & Michalska, K.J.  Challenges and Complexities during COVID-19 Crisis: Exploring Xenophobia through Asian NarrativesSukanya Ray, Ph.D., Catherine Vucky, Ph.D., Thanh Phan, Ellen Yang, Hannah Robins, B.A, and Yanxi Liu, B.S. "Asians Are to Blame for the Coronavirus": Racial Scapegoating During COVID-19Tao Liu, Ph.D. Examining the Impact of Vicarious and Direct Experiences of COVID-19 Related Anti-Asian Racism on Mental Health Symptoms of Asian Americans/AsiansYaochong Huang, Ashley Koh, Charles Liu & Tao LiuCOVID-19 Anti-Asian Racism and Mental HealthYea Jin Chang, M.A., LPC, Ruth Fu, M.A., Tao Liu, Ph.D. & Charles Liu, Ph.D.A Cross-Cultural Examination of Self-Presentation in Dating Apps: U.S. and South KoreaKatherine Gorospe, Paula Ong & Yuying Tsong, Ph.D.
12:45PM - 01:15PM
Poster Session II (Group 2 & 4)
Format : Poster Abstracts
Group 3 - Practice/ Mental HealthA Systematic Review of Depressive, Anxiety, and Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms among Asian American Breast Cancer SurvivorsSumaiya Nusrath, M.A., Ruidi Zhu, M.A., William Tsai, Ph.D., Happily Americanized? The Role of Acculturation in the Link Between Ideal Affect and Well-Being Among ImmigrantsDuc Pham, Victoria Monte, M.A. & William Tsai, Ph.D.Adverse Childhood Experiences, Resilience, War Trauma, and Depression Among Southeast Asian Refugees and their DescendantsKimberly Saelee, Psy.DAcculturation, Personality, and Depression Among Chinese and Chinese American Young AdultsZiyi XiuHow do Stereotypes Play out in the Therapy Room? A Qualitative Examination of Asian American Psychologists' Experiences of Being StereotypedDiane Lee, PsyD, Fernand Lubuguin, Ph.D.Advantages of culturally and linguistically competent pediatric integrated behavioral healthcare serving Asian American immigrant communitiesMeng-Ju Yang, Psy.D, Suzanne Giraudo, Ed.DThe Impact of Mental Health Policy and Community Stigma on Access to Psychological Services in South KoreaTina Lee, Nayoung KimRisk and Protective Factors of Suicidal Ideation among Asian American Adolescents in the United StatesMakiko Watanabe, Ph.D., Sherry Molock, Ph.D., Brian Clark, B.A., Dave Jean, Ph.D., Amrisha Prakash, M.A., Elizabeth Konneker, B.A., Nir Liebenthal, B.A., Linsey Mathew, B.A.Recommendations For Increased Engagement In Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment Among Asian American AdultsCatherine HuImplications for professionals: Working with South Asian parents with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)Roop SabharwalAsian American Narratives and Films for Furthering Social Justice and Racial BridgingMatthew R. Mock, PhD Group 4 - Social justice/advocacy & Watering Our RootsCommunity Outreach to Underserved Nepalese & Bhutanese CommunitiesPrem Pariyar & Preet K. Sabharwal, Ph.D.Model or Marginalized Minority? The Socialization Roots We WaterPuja Patel, Michele Chan, Gabriela Livas SteinIncorporating and Applying a Career Model and Three Mentoring Frameworks to Mentor-Protege Relationships With Women of Asian-American/Pacific Islander RootsSonali Singal, B.S., Mellanie Kristelle De Guzman, B.S., Portia Chan, M.A., Edna Esnil, Psy.D.Teaching Asian American Psychology through Times of CrisesMatthew R. Mock, Ph.D.The Relationship of Colorism to Colonial MentalityAngela Navata, Jennifer Robles, Jessica Dennis, Ph.D.Asian American Narratives and Films for Furthering Social Justice and Racial BridgingMatthew R. Mock, Ph.D. Sewing for Others: Asian American women finding purpose and meaning during the pandemicGrace J. Yoo & Allison PhungShame & Spirituality: Colonial Mentality and Indigenous Filipino RootsJacquelene M. Lopez, MA, MHA, & Jane M. Tram, PhDWomen as Active Agents in the Marriage Migration Industry: A Qualitative Inquiry from Vietnam to South KoreaCynthia Yoon & Tina LeeNamarūpa, the Buddhist definition of person: Philosophical and cultural basis for the simultaneous occurrence of soma and psyche in psychosomatic symptomsLiang Tien, Psy.D., ABPP, Debra Kawahara, Ph.D.Is greater critical awareness associated with more frequent sociopolitical actions? Moderating effects of values in Asian-White interracial couplesChun Tao, Ashley K. Randall
01:30PM - 02:30PM
Division On Students Programming/ Mentor Mentee Hour
AAPA understands the importance of mentorship. We have enlisted esteemed mentors to discuss their successful careers, share advice, and answer questions that span different career paths and stages. Based on registrants' interests, this year's mentoring hour offers three topics: (a) applying to internships/postdoc fellowships/graduate school; (b) early career/tenure and promotion; and (c) being AAPI. ATTENDEES, PLEASE READ:Attendees of the Mentor/Mentee session should change their names to be in the format below:  [Room number]_your name. Your compliance will help us assign people to the correct breakout rooms quickly and efficiently.Sessions and corresponding room numbers:#1: Applying to grad school/postdocs/internships #2: Early career issues #3: Being AAPITo change your Zoom name:Go to "Participants" at the bottom of your Zoom window -> find your name on the participants list -> hover the cursor over your name, select "More" -> select "Rename" -> enter and save your name in the suggested format.
01:30PM - 02:30PM
Townhall
02:45PM - 03:45PM
Closing Remarks and Session
Closing Session PanelistsAnnabelle AtkinAnnabelle Lin Atkin graduated with a BA in Psychology and Asian & Asian American Studies from the University of Connecticut. After teaching English in Korea, she returned to graduate school, earning her PhD in Family and Human Development at Arizona State University. Annabelle is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Arizona State University working on the Arizona Youth Identity Project. Her personal research interests are in the race-related development of Multiracial and Asian American adolescents and young adults, inspired by her experiences growing up as a Biracial Asian American. She is interested in understanding processes and experiences related to racial-ethnic socialization, racial-ethnic identity, and discrimination, examining how these factors interact to affect well-being. Annabelle's recent work involves qualitative interviews and measurement development addressing familial racial-ethnic socialization and support experiences of Multiracial youth. She also studies the racial attitudes, critical consciousness, and racial-ethnic socialization experiences of diverse individuals in efforts to understand the factors that motivate people to work towards achieving racial justice. Annabelle has been involved in the AAPA community as the expansion coordinator for the Division on Students, the student representative for the Division on Asian Americans with Multiple Heritages, and as a convention planner. Kevin LauKevin K. H. Lau is a doctoral candidate in the Counseling Psychology program at Arizona State University and a predoctoral intern at California State University, Northridge. He has been a member of AAPA since 2017. Since then, he has served as a student volunteer and Media Committee Co-Chair, and he is now the Chair of the Division on Students. As the new Chair, Kevin hopes to enhance student members' experiences by providing support, advocating for their needs, and creating more opportunities for professional development.Matthew Lee Matt Lee (PhD in clinical/community psychology) is a full professor in Northeastern University's Human Services program, where he teaches courses in counseling theory and practice, cross-cultural psychology, ethnic identity and conflict, and race, identity, and empowerment, and the senior capstone. His research has examined campus climate and advocacy for diversity/inclusion, and Asian American mental health as it relates to experiences of microaggressions that may be associated with phenotype or socialization.Devika SrivastavaDr. Devika Srivastava is a licensed Psychologist in private practice in Houston, Texas. She received her B.S in Psychology from University of Houston, did M.S coursework in Clinical/Counseling Psychology from Columbia University, and received her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Fordham University in New York City. She completed a doctoral internship at the DeBakey VA as well as her post-doctoral fellowship in Houston. Dr. Srivastava also was a Doctoral Fellowship at the American Psychological Association in the Public Health Directorate in the Office of Governmental Relations where she helped lobby federal policy in congress on health, social, and human rights policy for women, families, immigrants, veterans, people of color, refugees, students, and LGBTQIA+ populations, aging populations, and those with chronic illness. She also conducted policy research related to mental health and health outcomes for people of color and helped in advocating mental health legislation for various advocacy organizations on federal and state levels. Dr. Srivastava also served as a Clinical Programs Analyst at the Harris Center where she conducted clinical outcomes research and program evaluations on all county and state public mental health programs. She also helped create the Mental Health Needs Council report assessing mental health needs for different populations in Harris county for political advocacy purposes. Dr. Srivastava was also an Assistant Professor in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine and provided psychological and assessment services to all of the medical units of Ben Taub Hospital as well as supervised Post-doctoral Psychology Fellows, lectured medical students, and behavioral health therapists. She also was the Coordinator for The Social and Health Equity Course and lectured Psychiatry residents on issues related to multiculturalism and disparity, including presentations specifically on cultural competency and multicultural populations, and disparity in healthcare. Dr. Srivastava also has numerous research publications on mood disorders, psychotic disorders, chronic pain, family conflict, ethnic identity and perceptions of discrimination and mental health of second generation Asian American, risk factors for mental distress and psychosis, and on sexuality. Additionally, Dr. Srivastava served as a Financial Officer in the Asian American Psychological Association. Dr. Srivastava presently is the Chair of the Division on South Asian Americans (DoSAA) in the Asian American Psychological Association. She also organized the first national DoSAA mental health conference bringing together an entire community of providers, professionals, researchers, students, and community policy makers who presented (34 presentations and research posters) on various topics related to South Asian American mental health. She is also co-editor on the first ever book coming out focused on South Asian American Psychology and mental health and psychology.ModeratorRichelle Concepcion*This program qualifies for 1 Continuing Education Unit (CEU). CEU's are sponsored by Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.To receive your CEU, attendees must complete the following evaluation form: https://uisits.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0jojqBkf7tGJV9b
04:00PM - 05:00PM
Virtual Social Hour
Please join us for a final group goodbye as we close out the 2020 AAPA Convention. We will hear from our Convention Co-Chairs, Jen Hsia and Max Tokarsky, and members of the EC. We will close out the hour with HAPPY HOUR and TRIVIA. We encourage attendees to meet with one another and form teams of two. No need to sign-up beforehand. Bring your food, drinks, and best trivia brain! 
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